Latest Educational News

Controversy surrounds proposed Liverpool academy

by Guardian, June 28, 2005

The education secretary, Ruth Kelly, today gave the go-ahead to a new academy school for Liverpool, the second to be jointly run by a university and the latest to attract controversy before it has even opened.
The North Liverpool academy will take its first students in September 2006 and will be sponsored by Liverpool University and the educational publishers Granada Learning. A third sponsor, Stanley Fink, the chief executive of Man Group plc, will contribute to the building phase of the project. The academy will replace two comprehensives, Breckfield and Anfield community schools, serving 1,750 pupils aged 11 to 18, and will specialise in business and enterprise.

Academics urge fresh approach to science teaching

by Financial Times, June 28, 2005

Scientists have demanded tougher action from the government to protect and promote their subjects in universities.

Moving pupils harms learning education

by Guardian, June 28, 2005

Thousands of youngsters attending schools in London are having their education damaged because of soaring mobility among pupils in the capital, according to research published today.
In the most extreme cases, schools have seen a 60% turnover of pupils within one academic year, with many regularly losing and taking on new pupils every week.

John McGuire: University targets 'are failing UK plc'

by Manchester, June 27, 2005

What is Sir Alex Ferguson doing to prepare for the new season? Choosing some very good players, some average players and some poor players, to give everyone a chance?

No. He will be choosing the very best players to win the Premiership and secure the future of Manchester United.

Why then, in seeking to secure the competitiveness of British industry are we stopping the best students going to university and thefore depriving business of the very best potential employees?

Good grammar

by Telegraph, June 26, 2005

It will come as little surprise to readers who were fortunate enough to go to grammar schools that they remain beacons of educational excellence. As we disclose today, pupils going to selective schools accounted for 16 per cent of the candidates gaining straight A grades at A-level last year, up from 12 per cent in 1995. This statistic is all the more remarkable given that England's 165 grammar schools educate a mere 7 per cent of the nation's sixth formers.

Grammars double number of 'three straight As'

by Telegraph, June 26, 2005

The grammar school share of pupils gaining straight A grades at A-level has consistently increased over the past 10 years, government figures shows.

Probe into Gap Between Primary and GCSE Achievements

by Guardian, June 26, 2005

A left-leaning think-tank is to investigate why the Government’s massive investment in enhancing the literacy and numeracy of primary school pupils has not produced an equivalent boost to GCSE results.
The Institute for Public Policy Research plans to spend a year trying to establish the reasons for the disparity.

Top schools 'must be told to take difficult pupils'

by Sunday Observer, June 26, 2005

Successful secondary schools would be forced to admit over 30 disruptive and even violent pupils every year under a controversial report to be released in the autumn.
Popular schools should be required to reserve one space in every class for a pupil who has been excluded from another school, according to the report from the centre-left thinktank, the Institute of Public Policy Research.

Top schools 'must be told to take difficult pupils'

by Sunday Observer, June 26, 2005

Successful secondary schools would be forced to admit over 30 disruptive and even violent pupils every year under a controversial report to be released in the autumn.
Popular schools should be required to reserve one space in every class for a pupil who has been excluded from another school, according to the report from the centre-left thinktank, the Institute of Public Policy Research.

£1bn drive for literacy is 'failing at GCSE'

by Independent, June 26, 2005

Tony Blair's £1bn drive to improve reading and numeracy skills among children is failing, according to a leading Blairite think-tank.
The Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) has found that 16-year-olds are not getting better GCSE results despite the costly Government campaign to raise standards.

Girls keep their top places in GCSE lists

by Times, June 26, 2005

Girls’ schools again topped the league of best state school GCSE results in England and Wales yesterday.

For Tiffin Girls’ School in Kingston upon Thames it was an especially proud day. With 86.8 per cent of GCSEs at A* or A grades, it claimed first place on The Times’s table of results from more than 600 schools.

The selective grammar school’s 57.4 per cent of results at the A* grade set a record for a state school, lifting it from fifth place last year. [POP UP ALERT]

1,100 parents fined for truancy

by BBC, June 25, 2005

Parents in England have been ordered to pay 1,134 on-the-spot £50 fines for children's truancy since the start of the school year.
Government figures also show 11,500 have been put on "fast-track" schemes, where they face prosecution if pupils' attendance does not improve quickly.

Hindu state school could open by 2008

by Guardian, June 25, 2005

The country's first state-funded Hindu primary school could open in north-west London as soon as 2008, it emerged today, after it received the support of its local authority.
Earlier this month the London borough of Harrow backed a submission by the I-Foundation, a not-for-profit Hindu organisation, to seek government funding for the voluntary-aided school.

No to Blair's academies Education for the millions, not the ...

by Socialist, June 25, 2005

New Labour’s 'flagship' City Academies, schools run by millionaires and private institutions but paid for overwhelmingly by us, are in disarray. Their own workforces are coming into conflict with them.

Single-sex schools 'no benefit for girls'

by Times, June 25, 2005

Parents are exploiting exam rules for pupils with disabilities to secure extra time for their children in their GCSEs and A-levels.
Pupils are being given up to 25% extra time — 45 minutes more on a three-hour paper — under rules that were designed to help candidates with disorders such as dyslexia.



They have only to show through an assessment by specially trained teachers at the school that they are “slow” readers or writers to gain extra time and so potentially raise their chances of success.

Senior educational psychologists claim that between a third and a half of candidates at some schools are getting the extensions, which can boost schools’ results in exam league tables.

“It is becoming a national scandal,” said Bernadette McLean, principal of the Helen Arkell Centre in Farnham, Surrey, Britain’s oldest centre for training professionals to diagnose dyslexia.

Figures Show Improved A-Level Results

by Scotsman, June 24, 2005

The number of school leavers in Northern Ireland achieving two or more A-levels has jumped by 7% in just five years, it was announced today.
The Department of Education said the numbers achieving the qualifications, or an equivalent, had risen to 42.1% by 2003/04.

Cheats hit Russian colleges

by Guardian, June 24, 2005

The heads of some of Russia's most prestigious educational establishments yesterday admitted that students use surrogates to pass examinations for the most sought-after places.
Students are using increasingly ingenious methods to gain entry to top institutes, whose qualifications are a passport to lucrative jobs.

Almost 10,000 pupils expelled as violence against teachers ...

by Times, June 24, 2005

Expulsions from schools are running at their highest for five years, government figures showed yesterday.

Violence and threats against pupils and teachers accounted for almost half of the 9,880 expulsions last year, the Department for Education and Skills reported

Millionaire pulls out of city academy

by London, June 24, 2005

Tony Blair's plan for city academies was dealt a major blow today after a millionaire backer pulled out of a London project.
A charity founded by supermodel Elle Macpherson's partner, financier Arpad Busson, had promised to sponsor an academy for three- to 18-year-olds in Islington.

Education chiefs slam forum plan for parents

by Guardian, June 24, 2005

MOVES to scrap school boards in a bid to get parents more involved in the running of their children's schools have been rejected by city education leaders.
Education Minister Peter Peacock wants to replace boards with new "parent forums" which he says will encourage more mothers and fathers to play a part.

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