Latest Educational News

Parents of nine-year-old seek £144k tutor

by Money.aol, December 23, 2013

All parents want to see their kids achieve their potential. But two parents from Weybridge in Surrey have taken this to fairly extreme lengths: they have advertised for a tutor at the rate of £12,000 a month for every month their daughter meets the required standard to stay in school.

But why are they doing this, and is this becoming more commonplace?

Grammar schools: all students should have the chance to aim for excellence

by Guardian, December 22, 2013

Classified as 11 Plus.

The debate over the best way to educate children of secondary school age goes on.

Whether or not we reintroduce grammar schools, all children should have the chance to benefit from a grammar school curriculum ("Ofsted chief declares war on grammar schools", News).

Splitting school PE lessons by gender 'damages girls'

by Telegraph, December 22, 2013


An academic calls for gender-neutral PE lessons, insisting the traditional vision of football for boys and netball for girls is fuelling gender stereotypes in later life

More students want to study away from home – despite tuition fees

by Independent, December 22, 2013

Britain’s undergraduates are continuing to study away from their home towns despite the revolution in higher education, which has seen fees rise to as much as £9,000 a year.

Research shows the urge to fly the family home to study for a degree is stronger now than it ever was – either before top-up fees of £3,000 a year were introduced in 2006 or the £9,000 ceiling came in September 2012.

Record number of parents convicted over truant children

by Telegraph, December 21, 2013

Record numbers of parents are ending up with criminal records for allowing their children to play truant

Cost of grammars

by The Times, December 20, 2013

Classified as 11 Plus.

Many pupils who attended grammar schools could only afford to do so until they were 16. The better-off ones went to university

Sir, Kenneth Sanders (letter, Dec 19) was fortunate that in the Fifties his parents could afford to keep him at grammar school until he was 18. With no grants available until 18, like most of my classmates I had no choice but to get a job at 16 after our O-level exams to contribute to the family finances. Only our classmates from better-off families made it to university. Then, as now, money and class did count.

Holiday homework: is it really necessary?

by Telegraph, December 20, 2013

The increasing trend of primary and secondary schools announcing they would ban homework only seemed to fuel the debate- it even made the.

English-Mandarin bilingual free school to open next year

by Telegraph, December 20, 2013

The proposal was initially submitted to the Department for Education by a founding group, who all have an interest in bilingual education, and approval was ...

Six Nottingham schools put into special measures after Ofsted inspections

by Independent, December 19, 2013

A blitz on a city’s secondary schools by inspectors has led to six of them being declared failing and put into special measures, it was announced on Thursday.

Education standards watchdog Ofsted set in motion inspections of eight of Nottingham’s 15 secondary schools after concerns were expressed over their performance.

Nearly 50% of teachers have considered quitting jobs in past year

by Independent, December 19, 2013

Almost half the nation’s teachers have considered quitting the profession during the past year because of increased stress and cuts in pay and pensions, according to a survey published on Thursday.

The survey of 501 teachers by independent pollsters ComRes for the National Association of Schoolmasters Union of Women Teachers, showed 47 per cent had thought about giving up teaching - while 52 per cent had wanted to quit their present job.

Six Nottingham schools put into special measures after Ofsted inspections

by Independent, December 19, 2013

A blitz on a city’s secondary schools by inspectors has led to six of them being declared failing and put into special measures, it was announced on Thursday.

Education standards watchdog Ofsted set in motion inspections of eight of Nottingham’s 15 secondary schools after concerns were expressed over their performance.

Discovery New School campaigners go to Downing Street

by BBC, December 19, 2013

Parents and pupils from the first free school to be ordered to close have delivered a plea for a reprieve to Downing Street.

They said staff had not been given time to make the required improvements at Discovery New School in Crawley.

Its chair of governors has accused the government of crucifying it rather than allowing it to resolve its problems.

Six Nottingham schools placed in special measures by Ofsted

by BBC, December 19, 2013

Six secondary schools in Nottingham have been placed in special measures after a series of unannounced Ofsted inspections in the city.

Another school was said to have "serious weaknesses" and one was praised for its good leadership.

Three of the failing schools, all inspected in November, were academies.

Ofsted spokeswoman Louise Soden said the results were "a serious concern", adding Ofsted would "continue to closely monitor" the schools.

Grammar schools solve few things in the short term and nothing in the long

by Guardian, December 19, 2013

Classified as 11 Plus.

A truly fair education system may not be possible, but we can do better than make misty-eyed calls to expand grammar schools

Life is not fair. Some people are richer than others, some smarter. What are you going to do? Bumble on, like Boris Johnson, about Platonic notions of a genetically determined "overclass"? Rail against your draw in life's lottery? Or do you try to thrash out a system, albeit imperfect, that aims to equalise the accidents of birth?

Meetings planned to discuss grammar school's planned move

by Canterbury Times, December 19, 2013

Classified as 11 Plus.

GOVERNORS at Barton Court Grammar School have announced formal consultation on its planned move to Herne Bay.
Officials have written to parents to announce plans for a series of public meeting plus a dedicated session for parents and carers.

The joint letter from head teacher Kirstin Cardus and chairman of governors Dr Peter Klappa, says: "We have been very busy discussing this proposal with a number of stakeholders, receiving advice and listening to views.

Read more: http://www.canterburytimes.co.uk/Meetings-planned-discuss-grammar-school-s-planned/story-20332483-detail/story.html#ixzz2nuzg2AAB

Bullied children more likely to hallucinate or hear voices

by Telegraph, December 19, 2013

Children who are bullied at school are more likely to have heard voices, have seen hallucinations or be paranoid than those who were not, a study by the Universities of Warwick and Bristol have found.

UCAS: more students admitted to university 'with poor A-levels'

by Telegraph, December 19, 2013

UCAS research finds that record numbers of students were accepted into universities in 2013 but suggests the rise was driven by candidates with lower A-level grades

School meals 'leave kids hungry' in Wales obesity fight

by BBC, December 19, 2013

Many schools in Wales have clamped down on lunch second helpings for pupils in the fight against child obesity.

A BBC Wales survey has found a number of councils now leave the decision on extra servings to schools or caterers.

Powys bans pudding as seconds, Cardiff schools are urged to offer only extra bread, and Ceredigion extras are small, bringing complaints from hungry pupils.

Record numbers of students enter university

by BBC, December 19, 2013

Record numbers of UK students were accepted for full-time university courses this autumn, including more poorer students than ever before, says the Ucas admissions service.

This was a particularly "good year" to apply, says Ucas, with recruitment recovering from higher tuition fees.

Top universities were 70% more likely to give places to applicants with lower grades than two years before.

Six Nottingham schools placed in special measures by Ofsted

by BBC, December 19, 2013

Six secondary schools in Nottingham have been placed in special measures after a series of unannounced Ofsted inspections in the city.

Another school was said to have "serious weaknesses" and one was praised for its good leadership.

Several of the failing schools, all inspected in November, were academies.

Ofsted spokeswoman Louise Soden said the results were "a serious concern", adding Ofsted would "continue to closely monitor" the schools.

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