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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:30 am 
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Joined: Thu Oct 06, 2011 12:01 am
Posts: 91
I'm wondering if someone knows, what to do if DC is sick on the exam day or a few days before? By sick I don't mean flu or high temperature but things like stomach pains other unpleasant symptoms. Never heard of people re-sitting A levels.

I remember falling into this trap when my DD was going through 11+ examination process, don't want to repeat the same mistake.
DD is generally very nervous, it has an affect on her digestive system, making her life quite difficult from time to time. What people do if something went not as planned on the exam day? Are there ways to let examiners know that this particular child wasn't in his/her best shape on the day?

Thank you.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 10:48 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 2:45 pm
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This is AQA's version of Special Consideration All boards will have similar ruled.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 11:29 am 
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scary mum wrote:
This is AQA's version of Special Consideration All boards will have similar ruled.


thanks a lot


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 12:30 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 7:59 pm
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Be aware that the rules have tightened up considerably - and where it says the exams officer/school must support the application for SC, this generally means that they will require evidence regarding the condition (not just a parent saying "oh they were poorly") as the exam boards were concerned that too many people were basically "trying it on", unfortunately.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 3:56 pm 
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kenyancowgirl wrote:
Be aware that the rules have tightened up considerably - and where it says the exams officer/school must support the application for SC, this generally means that they will require evidence regarding the condition (not just a parent saying "oh they were poorly") as the exam boards were concerned that too many people were basically "trying it on", unfortunately.


But also don't forget that there is no such thing as a doctor's certificate for children to confirm illness (see several paragraphs down):
https://www.bma.org.uk/advice/employmen ... -at-school


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 4:33 pm 
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We have had to provide evidence of a medical condition - we have provided it in the form of the letter from the consultant to the GP confirming the diagnosis and setting out what the symptons are and how they would need to be managed should there be a flare up. If there is a flare up near exam time, then the SENCO already has the evidence that she can use should it be needed - the exam boards can then go back to both the GP and consultant should they need to. No need for an additional doctors certificate but no doubt that the medical condition is a real lifelong condition that can have a real, possibly fatal, outcome in certain conditions.

The school will support an application (should it be needed) because they have had the evidence from us from a specialist. Exam boards have told exams officers that in most "temporary" conditions, it can be managed in the centre by, for example, allowing a child access to a toilet (accompanied by an invigilator) if they have a tummy upset etc without needing to contact the exam board.

As I said before, unfortunately a few parents trying it on have meant they are now scrutinising everything more closely.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 13, 2019 5:31 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 6:36 pm
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Location: High Wycombe
This is the reason children should be encouraged to try their hardest for their mocks as well as the real things as the school then has some factual evidence of the level the student was performing at, rather than a "We are sure they would have been a grade 9 student". Be aware that even if the student suffers an immediate family bereavement the maximum adjustment is only around 5%


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2019 9:41 am 
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Thank you all, very useful information for us. We've got lot's of "proof" from the past 5-7 years, I just need to make sure that we're ready for a worst case scenario on the exam day. :(


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2019 5:15 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jan 22, 2008 6:36 pm
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Location: High Wycombe
Still will only be a tiny adjustment of mark if it happens. Read the notes on the post above. Not adjusted to grade 9 if they achieve a grade 6 due to illness. Even if they had achieved a 9 in their mock.


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 14, 2019 5:25 pm 
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Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 3:01 pm
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What happens if they miss the exam entirely?


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