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PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 11:55 am 
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It's hard, isn't it? When they are 10, small things sway them. Maybe my DS was particularly naïve but he wanted to go to a certain school because the food given out by the food tech department was good.
We are currently doing university visits & the attitude of the staff & students you meet has a disproportionate effect on your opinion when it should all be about the course.
Good luck for the next stage!


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 11:56 am 
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It is probably a good idea to have a discussion, but the ultimate decision is better to be yours (even if you have to explain why). If he chooses and it is an absolute disaster, it will be very difficult for him to come to terms with. Also, children may believe they are mature enough to make a decision about the next 7 years, but parents porbably have a better long term view - and are also more aware about any other family aspects that that decision may impact on. And secondary school does impact on family life.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 08, 2018 1:18 pm 
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DS 'chose' his school on the success of the rugby team :)

To the question; we never did any mocks but I can see the sense in wanting to prepare for the day. It could, I suppose, help with nerves if that is something that concerns you.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2018 10:52 am 
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scary mum wrote:
It's hard, isn't it? When they are 10, small things sway them. Maybe my DS was particularly naïve but he wanted to go to a certain school because the food given out by the food tech department was good.
We are currently doing university visits & the attitude of the staff & students you meet has a disproportionate effect on your opinion when it should all be about the course.
Good luck for the next stage!


Thank you and you are absolutely right: small things can sway children. DS has some favorite subjects and activities and he would like to continue improve those skills. That is, and I must to help him.

I wish you to find the best university too :D


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:00 am 
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RedPanda wrote:
DS 'chose' his school on the success of the rugby team :)

To the question; we never did any mocks but I can see the sense in wanting to prepare for the day. It could, I suppose, help with nerves if that is something that concerns you.


If it stimulates a desire to study at the particular school, why not. I have my hand up :D
DS has in priority QE and Bishop's Stortford College only because they have a professional swimming club.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:14 am 
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kenyancowgirl wrote:
If he chooses and it is an absolute disaster, it will be very difficult for him to come to terms with. .


It is possible to be the same result where parents decided instead of children.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:19 am 
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Lenazayka75 wrote:
kenyancowgirl wrote:
If he chooses and it is an absolute disaster, it will be very difficult for him to come to terms with. .


It is possible to be the same result where parents decided instead of children.

But then,crucially, a small child is not made to feel responsible; rather, a grown adult who has parental responsibility.


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:31 pm 
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It's true that small things can sway all 10 year olds! Mine preferred a school based on its motto!!

Re. mocks - we found them useful. We did 2. It helped get the feel of an exam hall, saying goodbye to use at the door of somewhere unfamiliar and queues and queues of nervous kids. Experience of multiple choice booklets is useful too but she'd tried some at home (just as well as first time she tried to draw her own box for a new answer when hers wasn't on the sheet, because it was wrong!).


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PostPosted: Tue Nov 13, 2018 1:44 pm 
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Joined: Mon May 16, 2011 1:05 pm
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Location: Reading
DDs ‘mock’ was at the Dining room table, with me ‘doing’ stuff nearby as a mild distraction. I’d drilled into her to ignore whatever was going on around her. Before she started I told her to imagine being in a classroom at the school she was taking the exam at (they don’t have them sat in a hall). After the first paper I got her to imagine she would do whatever she would need to do (eat snack, loo break etc).

It seemed to do the job, but mocks were less common 6 years ago.

(Oh, and she decided on schools based on whether she would have to wear a tie, after having to wear one at primary. She hated it with a passion. I think it was her biggest incentive at the time. :lol: )


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 14, 2018 10:12 am 
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Tinkers wrote:
(Oh, and she decided on schools based on whether she would have to wear a tie, after having to wear one at primary. She hated it with a passion. I think it was her biggest incentive at the time. :lol: )


Thank you!

Now I see how just one thing can turn the child's life :D


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