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PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2018 1:06 pm 
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Posts: 13
Thanks Poppety, it's good to learn how much time others spend practising. He hasn't done any formal mocks but is due to do something like that in the holidays, just to guage the timing aspect. We kind of did similar on our holiday - he took a couple of the Bond online tests as a bit of 'fun' and some synonyms practice - he's always got his head stuck in a book so that's good. I'd like to try 30 minutes or so each day give or take, maybe not if we've got a full on day etc and he still has his tutor during the hols.

What books are you using to practice? I have the Bond 10 minute tests and the Letts CEM 12 test papers book. It's good to know your daughter is becoming more confident with the timings, I'm hoping the same happens.

I agree, it is very difficult to know when too much is too much! Thanks.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2018 1:19 pm 
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Scaremongering by a tutor is not adding to this thread - he needs a break.

Trust your instincts here not random people with an agenda.


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PostPosted: Sun Aug 05, 2018 6:47 pm 
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We are using materials written by our tutor and also the CGP 10 minute tests and Letts vocab booster books. We have used Bond too but not so much recently. There are so many materials out there aren't there!


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2018 9:40 am 
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Thanks Guest55.

We have a booster vocab book too Poppety. I've come up with a solution and that is to give 50p each time we do some 11+ work - seems to have added a bit of motivation lol. Guess it'll be every day from now on :lol:


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2018 12:14 pm 
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I am a private tutor and a qualified teacher (there is a difference!) My experience tells me that parents (and tutors!) who drive a child too hard (evidenced by ongoing tiredness, reluctance to work and anxiety) are causing more problems than progress.

A low key approach is preferable: little and often, maintaining a fun approach, highlighting strengths as well as working on weaknesses, integrating numeracy and literacy into everyday activities and staying relaxed yourself.

This may also irritate some people, but grammar schools are not the only way to get a good education and comprehensive schools are not the jungles of feral children and exhausted teachers that some think. A good student with parents invested in the idea of education will do well whatever school they go to.

I went to a failing comp and came out with 11 top grade GCSEs, 3 good A levels and went to a Russell Group University. My son went to comprehensive school and then to Oxford, graduating with a First class degree and every exam prize. He never had any tutoring, but did have an academic home.

Obviously I believe in parental choice and I believe in fostering excellence and positive attitudes to education, but the levels of anxiety generated by this system are dysfunctional and unhealthy in many cases.

Anyway, I’ll step out of the pulpit now and reiterate: little and often, low key and fun.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2018 12:34 pm 
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Hi Iris, I totally agree re comprehensives too which is why I've been torn as to how much we need to put into it. I know that wherever my DC go they will be supported very well at home, and at a comprehensive they'll possibly have less pressure and will still able to achieve as well as grammar educated children. It's difficult because my son who's taking the 11+ this year, in my eyes, would be well matched to a grammar, whereas my daughter who will take it in two year's time, who is still very bright, will probably be more suited for a comprehensive.

We've definitely made progress after the tears the other day, he did another couple of 10 minute tests to 'get back on the horse' as such and was very happy (relieved) at how well he did. I'm trying to keep grounded about it all and am trying to find the balance that suits us as a family. Little and often is very good advice, thank you. I was mortified at myself when he cried about it the other day and felt terrible I'd essentially made this happen so a reality check was needed!

Thank you.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2018 8:50 pm 
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I am very pleased that your DC is feeling better about preparation and doing better on the tests too.

It makes me very sad to experience anxious, upset children too, but I try to take the opportunity to work with them on resilience which I hope gives them skills for the rest of their life.


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 06, 2018 9:26 pm 
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IrisM65 - you are not the only one on here that thinks this. I spent about half my career in comprehensives but we moved and that was no longer possible sadly. I loved teaching all abilities.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 09, 2018 10:47 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2017 10:40 am
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IrisM65 wrote:
I am a private tutor and a qualified teacher (there is a difference!) My experience tells me that parents (and tutors!) who drive a child too hard (evidenced by ongoing tiredness, reluctance to work and anxiety) are causing more problems than progress.

A low key approach is preferable: little and often, maintaining a fun approach, highlighting strengths as well as working on weaknesses, integrating numeracy and literacy into everyday activities and staying relaxed yourself.

This may also irritate some people, but grammar schools are not the only way to get a good education and comprehensive schools are not the jungles of feral children and exhausted teachers that some think. A good student with parents invested in the idea of education will do well whatever school they go to.

I went to a failing comp and came out with 11 top grade GCSEs, 3 good A levels and went to a Russell Group University. My son went to comprehensive school and then to Oxford, graduating with a First class degree and every exam prize. He never had any tutoring, but did have an academic home.

Obviously I believe in parental choice and I believe in fostering excellence and positive attitudes to education, but the levels of anxiety generated by this system are dysfunctional and unhealthy in many cases.

Anyway, I’ll step out of the pulpit now and reiterate: little and often, low key and fun.


Brilliantly said. It so true.


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