Go to navigation
It is currently Sun Dec 15, 2019 1:46 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2019 8:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 3:01 pm
Posts: 993
Deb70 wrote:
My eldest DS is 26 and has always been very focussed for a young guy. He is definitely not one to waste an ounce of energy on anything that isn't going to benefit him. He did his research and worked out that the most direct route to where he wanted to be was a degree. Went to uni, did economics degree followed by CTA (chartered tax accountant) exams paid for by graduate scheme in large firm, completed exams by age 24 and now works in a Big 5 firm. He hasn't got onto the property ladder yet but is well in the way to a deposit via ISAs etc. Yes it's been hard work but now starting to really pay off at age only 26, and he's in a far better place than he ever would have been had he not gone to uni, student loan notwithstanding.

Really encouraging Deb70 so thank you... I guess I just struggle with the sums as that was my first mortgage!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2019 8:51 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 11:41 am
Posts: 9578
Location: Essex
MrsSchool wrote:
Let's say you did the maths and that alone was enough for you to justify not sending them to University. Automatically you've cut off career choices like medicine, dentistry, law.. They are 18 now and it's not your sole decision to make but rather a joint discussion. They may go against your concerns and look into loans or getting a job rather than have you close the door on their future.

Universities are not just about 'debt' and 'loans'. I met my life partner there, met my best friends, travelled with them, definitely the best memories I have of my 'youth' and I'm now in my late 30s with two kids.


I'm sure you won't actually disagree with me when I point out that we don't send our DC to university, they go to university. Or don't - but it must be their decision. One can't stop them applying for a place. One can tell them until one is blue in the face that even if one personally did understand the loans / repayment system, one still wouldn't want them to apply for either the tuition or the maintenance loan (and personally, I do and I do), but the system doesn't depend on parents understanding it or approving of it - the applicant gets the tuition loan and a proportion of the maintenance loan without their parents submitting any details of their income and certainly without the requirement for their permission.

_________________
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.Groucho Marx


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2019 9:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 3:01 pm
Posts: 993
MrsSchool wrote:
Let's say you did the maths and that alone was enough for you to justify not sending them to University. Automatically you've cut off career choices like medicine, dentistry, law.. They are 18 now and it's not your sole decision to make but rather a joint discussion. They may go against your concerns and look into loans or getting a job rather than have you close the door on their future.

Universities are not just about 'debt' and 'loans'. I met my life partner there, met my best friends, travelled with them, definitely the best memories I have of my 'youth' and I'm now in my late 30s with two kids.

I am not trying to cut off any career choices... my DS does not know I am asking this and I would not want him to know. It is just my ramblngs and doubts; he will be encouraged whatever he decides (and encouraged to go to Uni if that is the path he chooses).

I am just looking for opinions as it is all so confusng when DS has no idea and he is looking at a huge debt for what could be a mistake (in terms of choice).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 30, 2019 9:40 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 4:04 pm
Posts: 1860
I spent the weekend with a close friend whose child is considering career options. He is probably able to go to university if he wanted to (predicted C/D's at A level). He's currently considering the police force as a career and my friend is under the impression that, although they are moving to degree-only entry, there will be opportunities for him to do the degree whilst working within the police (rather like an apprenticeship). Another friend of mine has a child who has been offered degree courses which sound very sought after (engineering at prestigious universities) who has turned them down for an apprenticeship at an even more sought after company.
I think there are opportunities without degrees but I think a degree still - for most people - confers more opportunities in life.
I agree and disagree with the pp who says that university is not just about the study - I'm a few years older but in our day, yes, university was as much about fun and independence and self-discovery as it was about learning. My DH who teaches sixth formers says it is very different nowadays - the students tend to do more hours, study harder, usually work for money as well, far more often live at home... I would not now advise my children to go for the "experience" even though it was such a great experience for me.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 7:13 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 7:59 pm
Posts: 6202
My Careers Adviser head also reminds me that even if you get into a career without a degree nowadays, further down the line you are more likely to come up against a barrier becuase you do not have the original degree (and yes, it does happen - a friends father came up against that barrier last year and is now having to frantically complete a degree to enable him to take the next step in his career - and he is very close to the top of the organisation!)

But I would recommend a student who doesn't know what they want to study at uni to consider this: do you have a passion for any subject? If you do then you would do as well to study that if you want to go to university - it is still true that 40% of graduate jobs do not specify a discipline, they just want a degree (usually at a minimum grade). If you don't have a passion then consider taking a year out to travel and work and get a feel for the real world - it might help spark a passion. With this you can also apply for apprentisceships - good quality ones are exceptionally hard to find and the application process can take over a year, so you have to have back up plans to this option too.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 7:27 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 7455
Location: East Kent
I loved my time at uni.

However, I went at 29 having worked for 12 years before that.

I really appreciated it then (although I missed out on most of the social aspects of being a student)

My degree and PGCE changed my career path and at 37 I became a teacher and spent 25 in a job that I loved.

Not going at 18 doesn’t mean not going at all.

A career which sponsors you through university is another option.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 03, 2019 12:41 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri Mar 04, 2011 2:32 pm
Posts: 1101
I have a different angle-many countries have much better treatment of tenants than England, and owning property is not necessarily the ultimate goal of every adult life. Things could change here too.

Yes some age groups have benefited enormously in this country from ridiculous increases in property value, which are really a bubble. But there are significant downsides to owning property, particularly on your mobility for jobs. Yes you need to save for retirement but there are other investments besides bricks and mortar.

Having watched my friends try to settle, start a family, then suffer when house prices fell and they lost jobs but were trapped, back in the day, I worry about that scenario or something similar for a new generation.

The relevance of this train of thought to Uni is, uni is a different sort of investment, not purely financial. The system here with the "loans" that you only pay once you are earning X, if you never earn the threshold, or lose your job you don't or stop paying, and are forgiven at 30 years (how is that a loan? Martin is right, it's a graduate tax) is much better that i.e. the US. people there don't get forgiven, no matter what happens to them, and worry to death. THAT is a loan! and a right awful burden it is.

I don't think uni is worth it just for the sake of going to Uni, you need to either be exploring further options if undecided, or following up and testing possible careers; however I think it serves some employers as a proxy of capability/intelligence and also it provides a buffer time for very new adults to navigate the world with a bit of helpful transition structure and to keep them getting trapped in hand-to-mouth gig jobs that have replaced some proper employment and provide no development for them.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jul 27, 2019 2:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Aug 13, 2015 3:01 pm
Posts: 993
Sorry I took so long to reply but thank you for all your comments. I was (am still) just concerned that with no clear career path then university is an expensive distraction. I know the world has changed since I was at school and degrees are (more or less) a necessary "evil" for any career. I think KCG may be right that a year out would be good for DS but then he is not confident enough to do a "gap year" so I am not sure how that would work. Not all of our DCs are perfect so I need some help muddling through helping him make the right decisions. But, again, thanks for all the input - it does help.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 29, 2019 11:26 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
Posts: 3030
A "gap year" doesn't have to be traveling to exotic places.
Living at home working can also be constructive especially if free time is used wisely.
If you can afford it then even a zero hours job can leave time for volunteering or unpaid experience in environments that might be considered for future careers.
For some just being a bit older can help.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jul 29, 2019 1:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 11:20 am
Posts: 457
There is always the option of a Sponsored-Degree Apprenticeship. If your DS has any inkling as to what career path he wants he could research opportunities now. A number of companies offer positions in a wide range of careers. Some are competitive and applications open early in the academic year. Normally they are working 4 days (earning a salary :D ) and studying 1 day (distant or attendance at Uni). Most SDA's last 4 years though, but could be ideal if he is not craving "Uni-life" or debt.
Good luck.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 28 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2019