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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2005 6:43 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
Posts: 1348
Location: Berks,Bucks
Dear Patricia,

I didn't mean that Bucks dumbs down the tests, just that it's not as hard to get a place as in some of the London grammars for example. I don't know if I would consider entering my son in one of theses schools. Not only the exam must very hard, but the academic level of the studies must be very hard as well.

My reasoning was very simple when I was trying to decide about grammars. If 30% of school places in a region are grammar places, it's worth considering a place for your child if your think that he/she is in the top 30% academically. But if it is 5%, then he should be in the top 5%. May be it's too simple.


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 Post subject: thanks
PostPosted: Mon Dec 12, 2005 8:32 pm 
Hello all

Thanks, it has been a great help, She is the top performer in her class, and the youngest, so we are really proud. She loves learning and we just want her to reach her potential, but not to push her too far, that she ends up doing the opposite. I will get the practice papers and see how she goes.
We live in London and were looking at St Michaels Catholic Grammar as we are practicing Catholics, but would consider others.
What i don't want is that if she doesn't get a place we are left with few choices for a decent secondary school, that will take her on second choice!
Thats why i wanted to know, how i know if she is bright enough, and if it is owrth taking the risk. We live in Islington andthe choice of secondary schools have much to be desired.
Children eh?
Any other tips and advice are all greatly welcomed.

Thanks

Mary


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 9:12 am 
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Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2006 4:07 pm
Posts: 2718
Dear Catherine

We are probably discussing this on the wrong thread. Whether its a London, Birmingham or Bucks grammar school. The academic standard is going to very similar, they are all studying for the same GCSEs all get their 98/99/100% pass rate.

At the end of the day a minimum score has to be reached to gain a place. It is not easier to pass a test in Bucks, its probably easier to gain a place, as long as the child has passed the minimum standard, because we have more grammar schools.

Are we on the same wave length now?

Patricia


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 5:57 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
Posts: 1348
Location: Berks,Bucks
I wholeheartedly agree that we are on the wrong thread, Patricia, so I am carrying on the exam thread. Not on the same wave length I am afraid…


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Dec 13, 2005 6:14 pm 
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Joined: Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:47 pm
Posts: 1348
Location: Berks,Bucks
Tiggerbabes1234,

Just two more suggestions

May be you could pay a visit to the school you are interested in. They may be able to give you the pass rate and the expected level of the pupils.

The other one is to repeat your post on the Regions section below where you would have more chance to have it noticed by someone of your area.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 24, 2006 11:31 pm 
Can anybody explain the following:
140 STANDERDISED SCORE IS THE HIGHEST YOU CAN GET THIS equated to the following
75% IN VR
71% IN NVR
75% IN MATHS

It seems that the highest score is 75%?

If a child got 90% in VR,NVR and Maths, what will be the staderdised score?


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 Post subject: Age Standardised Scores
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 8:14 am 
Hi Wondering,

The linkage between the Age Standardised Scores and Raw Scores varies significantly from exam to exam. The reason being that the Standardised scores are a normal statistical Normal distribution with the score of 100 being the 50th percentile (ie average score of all children taking the exam).

So it's quite possible for the average (50th percentile) mark for a easy exam to be a nominal raw mark of say 80%, and at the same time be only 40% say for a difficult exam. Obviously these vary with the child's age as the title suggest.

There is always a direct linkage between Standardised Scores and the percentage of children achieving that score but NOT the raw score.

The 140 Maximum score is not actually correct.

A Standardised score of 139 or better on the Standardised scale means that only 1% of the candidates taking the exam achieved that score or better. I have seen scores of 146 for some 11+ exams - again it depends on the exam. A score of 118 (often quoted as an approx pass mark) equates to about the 86th percentile.

A highest raw mark of circa 75% does sound low.

What LEA are you in and where dod the figures come from?

Hope this helps.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 12:44 pm 
Thank you, KAR
the figures are from the first past of this thread.
Can I say, the highest score (raw) in the exam represent the 100% of the standardised score? For example, if the child who has got 90% right answers in the exam is the highest raw score, then it means 90% is the 100% standardised score, i.e. 140?

I have seen some information that somebody's child got 419 right out of 420, this dose not mean that his child only lost one mark in the exam? I think this only mean that his child only got 1 mark less than the highest standardised score, am I right?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 12:45 pm 
Thank you, KAR
the figures are from the first post of this thread.
Can I say, the highest score (raw) in the exam represent the 100% of the standardised score? For example, if the child who has got 90% right answers in the exam is the highest raw score, then it means 90% is the 100% standardised score, i.e. 140?

I have seen some information that somebody's child got 419 right out of 420, this dose not mean that his child only lost one mark in the exam? I think this only mean that his child only got 1 mark less than the highest standardised score, am I right?


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 25, 2006 4:56 pm 
Hi

In answer to your questions:-

Quote:
Can I say, the highest score (raw) in the exam represent the 100% of the standardised score? For example, if the child who has got 90% right answers in the exam is the highest raw score, then it means 90% is the 100% standardised score, i.e. 140?


Not quite as this depends on Age, the total number of questions and the spread of results. For example in one key stage 2 spelling tests (published on the QCA web site) - there are only 20 questions and the maximum score that an older child could get who achieved 20/20 correct may only be 138 whereas a younger child may get 140 for 20/20. If you have more questions (as in 11+ tests) and a greater the spread of results, then this generally produces a wider Standardised range. In Birmingham 11+ for example last year the the maximum standardised score was 146 on some tests.

Quote:
I have seen some information that somebody's child got 419 right out of 420, this dose not mean that his child only lost one mark in the exam? I think this only mean that his child only got 1 mark less than the highest standardised score, am I right?


This is correct, looks like this is over 3 tests. Although you need to bear in mind that if you have a very bright young child they might still get several questions wrong to achieve the highest standardised score of 140 compared to an older child. It varies from test to test but it can for example be a spread of say 5% or 6% of the raw marks for the same standardised score.

Hope this helps


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