Go to navigation
It is currently Thu Jul 02, 2020 1:14 pm

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2019 7:12 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jan 18, 2012 11:41 am
Posts: 9949
Location: Essex
Back when we were applying for secondary places for our respective DDs, a colleague and I joked about having them taken into care, in order to move them into pole position for their favoured comprehensive school, should they flunk the 11+. (Note: DD did. She was allocated a school the other side of the borough that we hadn't even considered. She was fine. At no point during her year there did the words, If only we'd put you up for adoption, the fact that this year we were too far away from our catchment school for you to get a place would have been irrelevant never crossed my lips :lol: ).

One hopes this is a case of, Only in America :lol::

https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/guardianship-surrendering-parents-divide-us-university-leaders?utm_source=THE+Website+Users&utm_campaign=50adc04000-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2019_08_01_02_41&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_daa7e51487-50adc04000-66200765




The case of US parents surrendering guardianship of their children to help them afford university is revealing high-level fault lines within academia over blame and duty in the country’s growing student debt crisis.

The situation involves at least two dozen instances in which parents in the Chicago area signed over guardianship of their teenagers to a friend or relative, legally cutting financial ties so the students would become eligible for federal, state and university aid and scholarships.


_________________
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read.Groucho Marx


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2019 8:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Sep 27, 2008 9:51 pm
Posts: 2546
The UK equivalent would presumably be demonstrating estrangement from parents when applying for student finance. Have a read around that and ask yourself whether you think anyone plays the system :? .


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2019 10:45 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Sep 27, 2016 9:52 am
Posts: 151
In NZ students were known to make marriages of convenience in order to improve their funding situation. An acquaintance married his cousin and then got an annulment after university. When officialdom caught on they denied annulments and insisted on full divorce proceedings. Don’t know if this dodge still works though.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2019 4:38 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:28 pm
Posts: 3030
This isnt new.
When I was at University in the 1980's the maintenance grant was means tested and I knew of people who took legal action to be officially estranged from their parents in order to obtain the full grant.
I didn't qualify for the grant but my parents couldn't afford to give me what they were deemed to be able to so things were pretty tight.
Estrangement is drastic but I can see how some people feel desperate.
No doubt there are others who are 'playing the system'.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 02, 2019 9:00 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Oct 13, 2018 4:00 pm
Posts: 299
When my son was at Uni,the was the only one in his (large) circle of friends who had to have a job throughout his degree. Everyone else received the maximum loan because either their parents were divorced/retired/unemployed or they lived at a different address or some other reason. We on the other hand, still married and both working, despite having two young children at full time nursery (costing a fortune) were deemed to be able to support him. We did what we could but he had to work. Maybe we should get divorced when the younger ones go to uni, especially when theyll be there together!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 30, 2019 8:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 01, 2010 9:57 am
Posts: 442
Our daughter now in 2nd year, is also one of very few, who was entitled to the minimum loan, and also the only one in her year who has worked since gcse, has worked full time throughout the summer, and has secured 15 hours a week for the same company for the rest of her term time at uni. There are so many of her huge affluent circle, who have been allocated full quota, on the basis of divorce/estrangement etc. One girl’s parents actually managed to get a full bursary for 5 years as her mum was divorcing, and they claimed the dad was not supporting them. Literally the day she left school, they both acquired brand new cars, moved to a much bigger house, and went to Hawaii for a month. Turned out the dad was an ex-con, so we made of that what anyone would! Yes corruption like this is rife..sadly not only America.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Sep 30, 2019 10:17 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jul 27, 2008 3:02 pm
Posts: 505
Location: S E London
Things have always been thus. When I was at uni over thirty years ago, a friend of mine received a full grant because her parents were divorced and her mum didn't earn much. Her dad bought her a house and gave her money too. But I did benefit, because she rented me a room for a very low rent!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 7 posts ] 

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2020