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PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2016 10:09 pm 
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LooniesMum2 wrote:
A smaller point, but not insignificant - the timings of the exams may play a part in terms of which boys pass AGSB and which don't. With my eldest DS, much as we had tried to prepare him for the AGSB exam, with hindsight I would say by January when he sat independent school exams he was in an entirely different place, ability wise and psychologically. His handwriting changed massively between September and January, as did his verbal reasoning skills. It wasn't just down to the preparation - his brain just developed more in the four month interval.
LM2


Exactly. If that school was MGS, you must be very proud of your son's achievement LooniesMum2.
Most grammar exams are tutorable and most of the times, it's down to the child's preparation and mood. A "not so bright" pupil practicing a GL type test paper 100 times is more likely to pass an official GL paper than a "truly bright" pupil who hasn't or maybe just encountered a GL paper only once or twice. MGS wasn't an exception to this years ago as some posh parents had their boys heavily tutored to pass the MGS written test only to find their boys suffering from fast learning pace and unhappy in the midst of truly bright pupils and in the end they were asked to leave the school to avoid giving them a D or E result. That's why MGS found a way of screening "truly bright" pupils through their own unique assessment and keep private tutors totally out of the game. One example or their assessment include 30mins lecture of unique series of numbers requiring logical analysis or any instructions that pupils have never encountered in their lives then all pupils will be tested based purely on that lecture. This way, a "truly clever" pupil will stand out and the heavily tutored "not so bright" pupil will have no clue how to do it and will lose his way. That is only one part of their 1 whole day assessment that includes essay writing, and many more so every single pupil that pass the MGS' screening is guaranteed to be "truly bright".

quasimodo wrote:
Looking at the results you would have to say MGS's results are clearly superior.


It justified my statement. Anyone that managed to get through MGS' unique screening is a truly clever boy, with the school's value added, it's not surprising that they manage to send around no less than 20 pupils to Oxbridge every year.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2016 9:49 am 
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enigma wrote:
LooniesMum2 wrote:
A smaller point, but not insignificant - the timings of the exams may play a part in terms of which boys pass AGSB and which don't. With my eldest DS, much as we had tried to prepare him for the AGSB exam, with hindsight I would say by January when he sat independent school exams he was in an entirely different place, ability wise and psychologically. His handwriting changed massively between September and January, as did his verbal reasoning skills. It wasn't just down to the preparation - his brain just developed more in the four month interval.
LM2


Exactly. If that school was MGS, you must be very proud of your son's achievement LooniesMum2.
Most grammar exams are tutorable and most of the times, it's down to the child's preparation and mood. A "not so bright" pupil practicing a GL type test paper 100 times is more likely to pass an official GL paper than a "truly bright" pupil who hasn't or maybe just encountered a GL paper only once or twice. MGS wasn't an exception to this years ago as some posh parents had their boys heavily tutored to pass the MGS written test only to find their boys suffering from fast learning pace and unhappy in the midst of truly bright pupils and in the end they were asked to leave the school to avoid giving them a D or E result. That's why MGS found a way of screening "truly bright" pupils through their own unique assessment and keep private tutors totally out of the game. One example or their assessment include 30mins lecture of unique series of numbers requiring logical analysis or any instructions that pupils have never encountered in their lives then all pupils will be tested based purely on that lecture. This way, a "truly clever" pupil will stand out and the heavily tutored "not so bright" pupil will have no clue how to do it and will lose his way. That is only one part of their 1 whole day assessment that includes essay writing, and many more so every single pupil that pass the MGS' screening is guaranteed to be "truly bright".

quasimodo wrote:
Looking at the results you would have to say MGS's results are clearly superior.


It justified my statement. Anyone that managed to get through MGS' unique screening is a truly clever boy, with the school's value added, it's not surprising that they manage to send around no less than 20 pupils to Oxbridge every year.


I have been reading posts in this thread, it's an interesting discussion.
There's an article in the Times today (subscription required), which suggests that,teenagers gain only a slight advantage in exams by attending an independent school sixth form.
More details can be found at this link http://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/ ... -wf6g8wrr7

I hope it's ok to copy and past some of the information

"Most of the superior A-level performance is down to students’ higher ability on arrival, according to the SchoolDash education data website.

It indicated that the “value added” of private education at this level was minimal, the Times Educational Supplement reported yesterday. Attending an independent sixth form added an average of about 0.1 of a grade per student per subject at A level, when prior attainment at GCSE was taken into account.

In particular, private schools added little more value than state schools when it came to science, with the best state schools providing most progress in physics, maths and chemistry.

Independent schools performed better in humanities and languages, with about two in ten students achieving a grade higher per subject than would be predicted based on past performance."


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2016 10:12 am 
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Shame they didnt do the same when 20 boys joined in year 5 or with the boys that were already at the school.

Erm, anyone.know how many new boys will be entering in year7?


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2016 10:34 am 
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ManYou wrote:
Shame they didnt do the same when 20 boys joined in year 5 or with the boys that were already at the school.

Erm, anyone.know how many new boys will be entering in year7?


https://www.mgs.org/204/junior-school

The schools website seems to suggest otherwise with their assessments.Hence the reason existing boys don't need to take the entrance exam for year 7.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2016 6:11 pm 
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Location: Cheshire
kendun wrote:
There's an article in the Times today (subscription required), which suggests that,teenagers gain only a slight advantage in exams by attending an independent school sixth form.


There is a law of diminishing returns when it comes to Private education.The greatest value is added at Prep School then Senior School upto yr 11,by 6th form the gap is marginal since A level studies are more independent and self learning in nature.

By university the trend actually reverses, state children with similar A levels start to outperform their Independent peers.

But there is one small fly in the ointment, State school funding cuts at 6 form level may start to have a significant effect on the State sector to compete with the Indie sector-We will have to wait and see the impact of this shortsighted policy.


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2016 6:38 pm 
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I was referring to the previous year. i.e the kids that would have been in Y5 last year.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 7:08 pm 
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Hi
Can someone tell me what are the chances of entry into AGSB if you live well outside the catchment area? My understanding is that this school has more of a preference for local kids compared to AGSG. Is it still worth applying to?

Thanks


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2016 9:30 pm 
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Iofthetiger, if u live well out of the catchment area for alty boys then ur child has to score a very very high score, 390 would probs get him in. As for the local kids in alty, u are right, as long as they score past the qualifying mark which is usually around 335, ooc u have to score near the 400 mark.

If ur son is very bright and shows potential and only u or ur partner will know then I would let him sit the exam. :)


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PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2016 9:21 pm 
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Iofthetiger wrote:
Hi
Can someone tell me what are the chances of entry into AGSB if you live well outside the catchment area? My understanding is that this school has more of a preference for local kids compared to AGSG. Is it still worth applying to?

Thanks

Don't worry about it, the required OOC score usually is not too high to bother about, one of the lowest qualifying scores for OOC I've seen was 343. The catchment for AGSB is not big so the probability of all in-catchment pupils getting the required 334 is not as high as that of Sale or Urmston. If you're OOC, there's more chance getting into AGSB than Sale or Urmston.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 11, 2016 2:51 pm 
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Iofthetiger wrote:
Hi
Can someone tell me what are the chances of entry into AGSB if you live well outside the catchment area? My understanding is that this school has more of a preference for local kids compared to AGSG. Is it still worth applying to?

Thanks


The boys grammar publishes the out of catchment score each year. I think last year it was 342 (so not massively different than the catchment pass score of 334), so anyone scoring above that (regardless of where you live) would have been offered a place.


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