11 Plus Exams Forum
http://www2.elevenplusexams.co.uk/forum/11plus/

Exceptionally high scores due to exceptional cohort
http://www2.elevenplusexams.co.uk/forum/11plus/viewtopic.php?f=15&t=57431
Page 3 of 3

Author:  DSDSDD [ Mon Mar 04, 2019 2:55 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Exceptionally high scores due to exceptional cohort

ayparents wrote:
DSDSDD wrote:
In my example, it being WHSB i/c of 303.

@DSDSDD,
I hope I didnt misread this comment. If yes, apologies in advance.
Are you stating your DC score is 303 and offered WHSB? If not, do you want to share the score of your DC?

You have misinterpreted.....no need to apologise. I was merely stating that to “throw your hat in the ring” for WHSB i/c, you had to score at least 303. After that it was all down to ranking.

Author:  Wontsleeptonight [ Mon Mar 04, 2019 3:00 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Exceptionally high scores due to exceptional cohort

DSDSDD wrote:
@ Sarmum - I commend your efforts, but all "exceptional cohort" analysis is meaningless as you're not comparing like-for-like. The increase in the number of candidates should/will have a proportional impact on the frequencies, but as I've alluded to earlier in this thread, you're not accounting for the effects that age-standardisation has had on the 2019 "Total Scores". Had age-standardisation not been applied, a number of candidates currently scoring >351 would have actually fallen within the 341-350 band, with the same principle applying further down the range.

Only (if and) when the non-'age-standardised' scores become available, will a comparative analysis be possible and of benefit.

This effect of age-standardisation is quite apparent in the WHSB i/c intake, (with a hard cut-off of 303) which in previous years 2017/18 was unable to fill its i/c allocation. For 2019 entry, age-standardisation has 'bumped-up' the scores to above this threshold of those who would have non-adjusted scores of 292.340-302.999, thus making them eligible for consideration. The result is that the i/c cutoff has risen to ~308 (based on earlier posts).



This is an excellent explaination and example. It is worth reading. Unless if course it is comforting to think of this year as exceptional.

There may be a slight increase in the performance. I know I was aware of age standardisation, and having an older child I knew this could be to his detriment. I would say that knowing this I made sure that we worked a little harder than we would have otherwise to make sure that scores came out well above green. Quite possibly others may have worked with a higher bar in mind.

Author:  onlymyopinion [ Mon Mar 04, 2019 5:05 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Exceptionally high scores due to exceptional cohort

I can only comment with respect to Southend, but I feel that this is relevant. As a parent of a child in the Southend Borough, the current Southend cohort has long been described as a 'boom' year - Primaries had to increase their numbers to accommodate the number of students, as have Secondary Schools now they are reaching Yr7. Whilst I am not going to sit here and state that the increase in IC places is purely down to this, couple this with a big push from the council to promote the Grammar schools with the local Primaries, it is logical to assume that it would have had some impact.

Author:  Janita [ Mon Mar 04, 2019 5:32 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Exceptionally high scores due to exceptional cohort

Totally agree with the "boom year" theory. Since reception all our local schools were struggling to accommodate the "year group" - more classes were built for example - and now that they are applying for secondary places. Same problem. "2007/8 baby boomers"

Author:  Zlatan [ Mon Mar 04, 2019 6:51 pm ]
Post subject:  Re: Exceptionally high scores due to exceptional cohort

onlymyopinion wrote:
I can only comment with respect to Southend, but I feel that this is relevant. As a parent of a child in the Southend Borough, the current Southend cohort has long been described as a 'boom' year - Primaries had to increase their numbers to accommodate the number of students, as have Secondary Schools now they are reaching Yr7. Whilst I am not going to sit here and state that the increase in IC places is purely down to this, couple this with a big push from the council to promote the Grammar schools with the local Primaries, it is logical to assume that it would have had some impact.


I was thinking this the other day driving back to Rayleigh via Rochford. Literally hundreds of family homes being built in these towns, most of which you imagine will have children living in them. I don’t have any stats to back this up but the number of children taking the exams in the catchment area must increase each year with all these new homes. Given I assume the numbers in the school must be pretty static that must increase the in catchment numbers passing. Wouldn’t be surprised to see the ‘303’ Level moving upwards in coming years

Page 3 of 3 All times are UTC
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group
http://www.phpbb.com/