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PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 9:31 am 
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Joined: Thu Nov 12, 2009 7:51 pm
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Location: CORNWALL
Thanks for replies. If only things were more transparent! Does anyone know how many children generally achieve a qualifying score?
Is it 120 plus an extra 10% for a waiting list, or can it be 400+?
Is there any information about how many children who receive the letter of eligibility don't actually gain a place?
And then I will try to forget all about it until 1 March . . .
:)


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 02, 2009 11:18 am 
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Children offered a place are told they passed the test, those not offered a place are told they didn't. Those not offered a place immediately have sometimes got one later when places have been turned down. Changes to the application system probably mean that there are fewer places turned down than in the past.

Hard question - would I have gone elsewhere - because it would have meant a house move to get into another suitable school. The answer is probably yes.

As for the school's morality children learn a little about each religion but morals are not confined to those with religious views. My concerns are not about religion as such but about basic values like decency and compassion. The school gets involved in charitable activities but that seems to me to be only because it is expected.


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 02, 2009 2:00 pm 
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Location: CORNWALL
hi, thanks for reply. so the january letter is a pretty sure indication of whether a child has a place then?

sad that you feel so let down by the school. be good if all the new parents could bear your points in mind and ensure that they send their children to school with such values already in place. and start to make a change from the bottom up if change is required!

i have to say that on the test day i was very relieved to see that prospective parents behaved well :) my normal school run is fraught with battling ignorant parents in 4 x 4s who park wherever they like and have zero concern for anyone else. i am hoping for better parents at colyton!


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PostPosted: Fri May 07, 2010 6:02 pm 
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January letter used to be a good indication if it says they've passed the etst. Sometimes those told they have "failed" are then admitted, although it's usually siblings. Unfortunately I learnt recently that they are now telling some children they have passed the exam and then not allocating them a place.

If your child got in don't expect the parents to be good all the time. There are some very impatient parents and not always in 4x4s. Also some of the 6th form drive.....if your child gets the bus tell them to keep to the side of the lane.


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PostPosted: Thu May 20, 2010 9:13 am 
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Location: CORNWALL
No set of parents could possibly be worse than our current ones when it comes to driving and choice of car! :)

There seem to have been a few teaching vacancies this year - Assistant Head, History, Biology, English, Business Studies - if I remember rightly.

Is there any insider info on that? I thought they had a pretty slow staff turnover but keep noticing vacancies....?


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 14, 2010 9:28 pm 
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The staff turnover is pretty slow to be honest. This year there have been a few vacancies though- from the best of my knowledge:

English- Temporary, covering maternity leave.
Business studies- Expanding the department.
Biology- Teacher leaving for 'personal' reasons.
History- Teacher retiring.

I don't really see the point in the January letter, I never had it and that was better. I know someone who's daughter passed and then didn't get a place; and someone else who's son failed, and then got a place. Seems like false hope to me.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 10:56 am 
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assistant head was a retirement, a biology teacher has moved to a more senior post. Wouldn't be concerned about staff turnover as it's generally retirment, younger staff moving to more senior posts elsewhere. Very occasionally I suspect one is encouraged to leave but that is very rare. The school has well motivated, polite students, who are easy to teach.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 17, 2010 7:17 am 
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Been watching this with interest. We had to leave Devon, county of my birth, just over a year ago due to a transfer at work. I was devastated because we had been told DS should go to Colyton and would stand a very high chance of gaining a place. This did however, give us the opportunity to look at where we should go and picked a village just outside Colchester because of its fabulous boys' Grammar. Our DS has just started.

In terms of A levels, when the final official league tables are published in April - as opposed to the newspaper lists which come out in August based on incomplete information - CRGS consistently comes top of all schools in the country. Also, just under 25% of its 6th formers gain places at Oxbridge Universities: this is only bettered by one (Girls) Grammar in the state sector. So how does its approach differ from Colyton? Primarily it does not put any boys in for any early GCSEs. It has a two year, focused 6th Form. Given that both schools take the abolute best from their surrounding areas it is reasonable to assume that the intake is similar so the difference in outcomes can only be down to what happens when they get there.

Having said this, while it is all very interesting for me and has made me feel better about the move, if you live near enough to get your DC into Colyton, and they had the right academic aptitude to comfortably gain a place there why would you choose anywhere else?


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 27, 2010 6:12 am 
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why choose anywhere else - because there are other schools that do extremely well for their pupils and perhaps are better at adding value. They may also be better at turning out happy and confident people. Confidence is extremely important in later life, including Oxbridge admission. Some pupils leave Colyton, especially at the start of year 12 for 6th forms elsewhere, and are happier and more confident as a result.

Making a choice of A level subjects, and therefore limiting your career choices, at 15 is too soon for some. I don't know if that number has increased with the need to make A level choices early but it is why some leave at 16 year to restart the 6th form with different subjects. I do know there is quite a bit of course switching and students finding they don't have the best choice of A level for the degree they wish to study.

Colyton takes bright well motivated pupils who are academically able. It turns out good exam results but other schools also turn out good results for such pupils, their overall results are lower because their intake is more mixed academically.


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