Go to navigation
It is currently Mon Sep 23, 2019 11:33 am

All times are UTC




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 5:23 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2016 12:55 pm
Posts: 669
crazycrofter wrote:
helen0209 wrote:
Just so you’re aware for Y8, they have end of year tests for Geography, Science and Maths and written assessments for English and History. The Maths and Science will determine the sets for Y9 - Maths is the same, 2 papers one calculator and one without and the science covers everything they have learnt in Y7 and Y8. The science one is what DS is stressing about currently, and we’ve had to explain revision timetables to ensure he captures all the topics. To be fair, they’ve had at least 3 months notice it was coming, and have been given loads of resources to help them which is good.

Best of luck with the end of Y7 tests.


Thanks for all the useful info Helen! Dd has had an exam week in May each year at KEHS and it’s been difficult enough with her - despite being reasonably conscientious and organised she really struggled to manage her time and find the right approach to revision. Lots of colourful pages and not much learned! I’m anticipating it being much much harder with ds (as are most things!) :)

GCSEs are going to be fun! I don’t envy Ricky going through it with two st the same time!


Thanks Helen. Very useful.
Crazy, I can't imagine it...bad enough just getting them both packed up for camping!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2018 6:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2015 6:44 am
Posts: 607
DD's at SCGSG. They have exam week the week before half term every year from year 7 to 10 in all subjects. It is nothing to worry about - just gets them gradually used to revising and exams. Don't worry. :D

Edited to add DD2 in year 9 did very little revision this year, just read her notes. She doesn't think she'll do very well. I don't mind - so long as she's pulled it together by year 11!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 6:50 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2016 12:55 pm
Posts: 669
booellesmum wrote:
DD's at SCGSG. They have exam week the week before half term every year from year 7 to 10 in all subjects. It is nothing to worry about - just gets them gradually used to revising and exams. Don't worry. :D

Edited to add DD2 in year 9 did very little revision this year, just read her notes. She doesn't think she'll do very well. I don't mind - so long as she's pulled it together by year 11!


Thanks, that's good to know. They're my first at secondary, so it's all new, yet clearly standard school practice.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 4:26 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 7:59 pm
Posts: 5903
I think it's possibly different in different schools - ours has a set exam week for Y7/8/9 every year (it was last week) and they are examined in every subject over the week, testing the whole year's work (as they get older it tests everything they have been taught, getting more and more similar to the GCSEs). The school take them very seriously - children vary - Y7 was a failry relaxed year with both my boys but their revision has noticeably stepped up each year - partly due to natural competitiveness and partly because it is closer to the real exams - also if boys do really poorly they can be made to resit - Y10 have mocks earlier this term - pretty serious as, combined with the Y11 mocks they give a very good indication of predicted grades (and, in the case of serious illness, are one of the factors used by the exam boards.) The 6th form exams have been an eye opener for us - now the school does not do AS levels, the Y12 exams take on a new seriousness (taken the week before half term) - they form the basis of the predicted grades, anything below a C is required to be resat in September and, at that point, a student can be advised to consider alternatives if they do not improve. The results are given out in the same way as the real things, so all quite stressful but makes them knuckle down.

Going through the process of exams each year is quite useful in taking the unknown out of it (how often do we hear on here about parents using mocks to help their child be ready for a big exam hall, for example) - it also helps stagger revision as they are made to do it for each set of exams. Generally, I would let them do their own amount of revision for the first year - it helps give them a kick up the bum when they are used to being top of the tree and find out that actually they aren't - and allows you to talk about different revision techniques that might work for them - and they learn about exam technique which is also a skill!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 6:20 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2016 12:55 pm
Posts: 669
kenyancowgirl wrote:
I think it's possibly different in different schools - ours has a set exam week for Y7/8/9 every year (it was last week) and they are examined in every subject over the week, testing the whole year's work (as they get older it tests everything they have been taught, getting more and more similar to the GCSEs). The school take them very seriously - children vary - Y7 was a failry relaxed year with both my boys but their revision has noticeably stepped up each year - partly due to natural competitiveness and partly because it is closer to the real exams - also if boys do really poorly they can be made to resit - Y10 have mocks earlier this term - pretty serious as, combined with the Y11 mocks they give a very good indication of predicted grades (and, in the case of serious illness, are one of the factors used by the exam boards.) The 6th form exams have been an eye opener for us - now the school does not do AS levels, the Y12 exams take on a new seriousness (taken the week before half term) - they form the basis of the predicted grades, anything below a C is required to be resat in September and, at that point, a student can be advised to consider alternatives if they do not improve. The results are given out in the same way as the real things, so all quite stressful but makes them knuckle down.

Going through the process of exams each year is quite useful in taking the unknown out of it (how often do we hear on here about parents using mocks to help their child be ready for a big exam hall, for example) - it also helps stagger revision as they are made to do it for each set of exams. Generally, I would let them do their own amount of revision for the first year - it helps give them a kick up the bum when they are used to being top of the tree and find out that actually they aren't - and allows you to talk about different revision techniques that might work for them - and they learn about exam technique which is also a skill!


Thanks for the heads up - thats really helpful. I might make the most of y7 as it intensifies across the later years. Good luck to your DS!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jun 09, 2018 7:18 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 7:59 pm
Posts: 5903
Thanks - DS1 has aced his A level Y12 mocks, which is a relief, so still on track and DS2 is Y10 and seems to be on track for his predicted GCSEs so the annual exam system appears to be working for them! I have to say though, that the local none grammar school I work in also runs a similar system - it is not peculiar to GS's.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jun 10, 2018 6:58 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2016 12:55 pm
Posts: 669
kenyancowgirl wrote:
Thanks - DS1 has aced his A level Y12 mocks, which is a relief, so still on track and DS2 is Y10 and seems to be on track for his predicted GCSEs so the annual exam system appears to be working for them! I have to say though, that the local none grammar school I work in also runs a similar system - it is not peculiar to GS's.


So a year 13 and year 11 from September? Look forward to getting some tips on managing x2 in exam season!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 10:11 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:59 am
Posts: 8056
I think most schools have some kind of exam at the end of Y7. It is a good time to encourage children to become independent and organise themselves. I also do not think it does them any harm at all to do rather badly in these exams, or in Y8, to know how that feels and to understand that they are going to have to take responsibility for their own learning now they are at Big School. Unless you want to be one of those parents organising their revision for them at GCSE time or even beyond, I suggest you hand it over to them now with tips and guidance if needed but basically no more.

All 3 of mine managed to bomb a couple of end of year exams in the early secondary years and it did them the power of good. Knowing you could have done better, and seeing people who have, concentrates the mind, and paves the way for the great feeling of success later on when they learn that the reward for hard work is the results themselves and you as a parent won't need to be bribing them with ridiculous grade-related payments, cars, fancy phones etc to try and get them to work for their public exams.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Jun 11, 2018 2:37 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Aug 14, 2016 12:55 pm
Posts: 669
Amber wrote:
I think most schools have some kind of exam at the end of Y7. It is a good time to encourage children to become independent and organise themselves. I also do not think it does them any harm at all to do rather badly in these exams, or in Y8, to know how that feels and to understand that they are going to have to take responsibility for their own learning now they are at Big School. Unless you want to be one of those parents organising their revision for them at GCSE time or even beyond, I suggest you hand it over to them now with tips and guidance if needed but basically no more.

All 3 of mine managed to bomb a couple of end of year exams in the early secondary years and it did them the power of good. Knowing you could have done better, and seeing people who have, concentrates the mind, and paves the way for the great feeling of success later on when they learn that the reward for hard work is the results themselves and you as a parent won't need to be bribing them with ridiculous grade-related payments, cars, fancy phones etc to try and get them to work for their public exams.


Thanks - he didn't want to do anything yesterday so we just left him to it. I know from experience that he's better not mentioning much whereas his twin is the opposite.

Now that I know the tests are typical in many schools it won't be a surprise next year either.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Privacy Policy | Refund Policy | Disclaimer | Copyright © 2004 – 2019