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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 03, 2018 7:23 am 
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Joined: Fri Jun 01, 2018 2:29 pm
Posts: 1
If she's reading and enjoying it, my focus would be on encouraging her to think intelligently about what she is reading - rather than on trying to push her into reading something else. I would definitely encourage her to think about a wide range of books and authors (exploring bookshops can be a good way to give her ideas), but I wouldn't worry if she tends to read in genres which aren't "serious".

The best thing you can do is talk to her thoughtfully about the things she reads, whatever they are!


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:15 am 
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Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2016 12:28 am
Posts: 57
Hi All,

I know this is an old thread, put i think this question is worth asking......

Instead of reading a whole classic book, is it worth considering the shortened down version of the books which is aim at children?

I thought having some limited knowledge of more of these stories is just as important as reading a few whole classic books.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 12:25 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 2:01 pm
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Location: Herts
It is actually the language that is so helpful rather than the plot so you need to be accessing the original words.

Try reading it to your student and stopping and explaining the difficult words. DG


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 12:28 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 21, 2013 7:59 pm
Posts: 5109
Condensed classics are usually designed to introduce younger children to classic stories in an easier to understand format. Whilst any reading is useful and understanding the stories equally so, in terms of helping with the 11+, the simpler language might not benefit in that sense.

But we did have classics in the house (both “real” and condensed) when the boys were growing up!


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 12:46 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 12, 2007 1:21 pm
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Daogroupie wrote:
Try reading it to your student and stopping and explaining the difficult words. DG


DG - most people on here are DIY so it is their child not their student!


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 1:40 pm 
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Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2010 11:39 pm
Posts: 2324
Listening to stories - audio books from the library. OH and I have had Stephen Fry reading HP to us on long drives.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 3:42 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 2:32 pm
Posts: 7275
Location: East Kent
Audio books are marvellous. A few years back, I was driving backwards and forwards between Kent and Gloucestershire every week. Audio books kept me awake.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:12 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jun 11, 2016 12:28 am
Posts: 57
thank you everyone and Daogroupie....

and yes, the student is my daughter :lol: as I am also a DIYer.

It is good to know it's the language that is important rather than the plot.... I thought reading books was to help with the creative writing part of the exam as well.

We read treasure island and most pages were a challenge for us. Even i found it hard... We are so busy looking up the words that daughter (aka student) forgets the plot... but I do remind her.

she liked wind in the willows, and narnia.... could you recommend some books like these?
I dont think I will get the condensed versions of the classics as the writing style is not the same, and I now understand it is the style of writing that is important.

any recommendations for the audio books please :wink:

thanks
FoodForThought.


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Sun Jun 24, 2018 11:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Mar 04, 2009 2:01 pm
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Location: Herts
Well done for reading Treasure Island and The Wind in the Willows. These two books are right at the very top of my list. I use figurative language from them all the time and have created comprehension papers and CEM from them.

Hopefully you have reviewed the words you have learnt and she is incorporating some of the words into her writing.

Anne of Green Gables, Tom Sawyer, Pollyanna, Heidi, Little Women are all books that ten year olds can enjoy and have the inference and vocabulary required for strong KS2 Comprehension and CEM performance. DG


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 Post subject: Re: Reading classics
PostPosted: Mon Jun 25, 2018 2:50 pm 
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Joined: Wed Jun 29, 2011 8:29 am
Posts: 1541
food4thought wrote:

Instead of reading a whole classic book, is it worth considering the shortened down version of the books which is aim at children?

I thought having some limited knowledge of more of these stories is just as important as reading a few whole classic books.


I'd be interested in hearing your reasoning behind this assertion.


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